Archive for the ‘Rescues’ Category

posted by Michel on Nov 13

After Mimi, and very recently, Jose very unfortunately disappeared it became clear that we had to hurry to provide especially the cats with safe housing. As you can see in the previous post, the catteries and dog kennels are coming along very nicely. On the other hand, we managed to save and/or help a few more needy animals. Here are their portraits:

Bora (l) and Roady

Bora (l) and Roady

Smeagol II

Smeagol II (rescued by Wout and Bhel van Hulst, temporarily at ASU)

Lucky (rescued by Alicia Adams, adopted by Maarten and Claudia Baks)

Lucky (rescued by Alicia Adams, adopted by Maarten and Claudia Baks)

Chikka (Tumor removed from his cheek, returned to owner)

Chikka (Tumor removed from his cheek, returned to owner)

Update 18 Nov.: Chikka died while in the care of his owners. The tumor was not removed entirely and the remainder grew back. Most likely it was so agressive that it had already spread throughout his body. How sad …

Update 25 Dec.: Kitten Roady somehow drew the agression of Snowy (one of our dogs). Being too small to fight her off, he suffered a bite which started an infection of which he died. I was shattered to hear this news. Only a short time before our safe haven for cats is ready, he fell victim to one of the many dangers that cats here face. Thank God that we were able to rescue him from the street and give him a relatively trouble free childhood …

Update 25 Dec.:Fortunately there is good news as well. Smeagol II was adopted by one of the ASU students. I had to leave him in the care of ASU because our shelter wasn’t finished at the time and he carried the contagious mange mites. He soon turned into the ASU VetMed’s most favourite pet, which resulted in his adoption. Fabulous!!!

posted by Michel on Feb 28

This story without a happy ending starts when Neressa and her niece spot a dog that is badly suffering from mange near the Kalibo shopping centre, which in my European mind looks much more like a permanent market. In any case, we notice how he generally hangs around a certain area, so we decide to try and catch him to get him treated. Soon I too spot him: he looks in an awful state, almost no hair, small open wounds everywhere. His slightly arched back suggests to me that he’s already an older dog. Unfortunately he won’t be tempted by offerings of food and one day when he’s sleeping in his favourite spot, I almost manage to catch him. Eventually I resort to making a catch pole but Smeagol doesn’t show his face for days … Then one day we tour the town with CARA volunteers Gia Robertson and Tracy Tuason who are visiting us from Manila and we spot him! Soon I manage to track him down inside the market and use the catchpole with effect. While the girls keep him secured, I go get the car with the dog kennel. As I arrive we notice that he’s totally exhausted and bleeding through his mouth. This guy is in even poorer condition than we thought!

Poor Smeagol is exhausted and VERY ill

Poor Smeagol is exhausted and VERY ill

We take him to ASU VetMed clinic straight away. Along the highway to Banga, we notice a black “bundle” of some sort lying by the side of the road: a puppy! We stop and quickly assess the situation. The little fellow is totally dehydrated and although probably a few months old, doesn’t weigh much more than the day he was born. Obviously, we take him along too.

Sam, left to die by the side of a busy road

Sam, left to die by the side of a busy road

When we arrive at ASU, both Smeagol and Sam are immediately inspected by the staff. They are indeed in a very sorry state. Sam is even unable to take in any fluids through his mouth and is put on a Dextrose drip. Smeagol turns out to be worm-infested.

The worms got to him before we did

The worms got to him before we did

Little Sam fighting for his life

Little Sam fighting for his life

Very, very sadly, a few days later we are told by ASU staff that they died. This time we just got to them too late. Rest in peace my dear little friends …

Note: Although Smeagol did not die from mange directly, infections caused by the mange could lead to more serious ailments. Furthermore, mange is infectious and is also know to occur in humans, so care should be taken when handling animal patients with mange. There are two varieties of mange: demodectic mange and sarcoptic mange (also known as scabies).

I found an extremely useful reference about mange on Wikipedia here. It mentions that medication is required (like Ivermectin) but that this is also quite effective. If you want to know more about mange, than please check out the link.

posted by Michel on Feb 28

Picture this: after not having been in our Philippine home for a year, I take our dog Falco for a walk on one of the first days after we arrive. The beach is always nice, so that’s where I usually go. On our first visit there I stumble upon a dog that has a terrible bloody lump over his left eye. Was it once even the eye I thought?

Otog has a severe condition on his left eye

Otog has a severe condition on his left eye

Clearly, we can’t let this situation continue, so the next day we approach the owner, a friendly lady whose family owns a house and lot by the beach, a she agrees to let us treat the dog, named Otog. We immediately bring Otog to the ASU VetMed hospital where Dr. Molly Naigan will operate on his eye. Otog is a frightened but kindly natured dog, so we already have a lot of sympathy for this poor fellow. The next day, the operation has turned out succesfully (but the growth might be a malignant tumor) but the wound clearly needs continuous care.

After the operation

After the operation

The following 2 weeks we visit Otog daily, taking care of the wound and monitoring his progress. Although he’s not used to eating proper dog food, we give his owner a bag of dog food to mix through his rice and fish so that he will get at least some extra nourishment. Every time we come there we are greeted by Otog wagging his tail, even though the cleaning that we do must give him some discomfort. He just realises that it’s us who helped him out of his predicament!

Otogs a happy oldtimer now!

Otog's a happy oldtimer now!

Finally, Otog turns out to be a happy old guy once more. After having looked after him for 3 weeks, we decide that he no longer needs treatment. The owner says that he’s much happier and active now. And the good news is: the whole neighbourhood now knows who we are and what we do. Wherever we go, they greet us and give us the thumbs up, shouting “Otog!!!” as they go along. Let’s hope our rescue makes a difference to even more local animals…

Update 18 Nov. 2009: Unfortunately we heard that Otog died early September. Only a few weeks before I arrived to check up on him. Still, it makes me happy to know that we gave him half a year of relative comfort.

posted by Michel on Nov 28

This story is dedicated to the countless innocent animals that were abandoned by their owners and as a consequence lost their lives at the hands of humankind all over the world in institutions like the Manila Dog Pound.

A pictorial of Falco’s rescue can be found at: Falco

Isn’t it amazing how a rescue comes about and how many people, even unknowingly, contribute? This is the story of Falco, whom we adopted recently and his rescuer (twice!), Tracy. It all started with a posting on a public forum by a Dutch chap that I know who was looking for a dog in the Davao (Mindanao, Philippines) region. Because I know lots of people who deal with stray animals and their rescue in the Philippines, I suggested to him we’d try find him a rescued animal, rather than one from a breeder. Unfortunately, the acquaintance has not decided what to do until today, but the essence is that many emails were sent back and forth until one came up that said something along the lines of: “Please adopt this dog before Friday or he will die in the Pound!”. It was a plea by Tracy Tuason of CARA in Manila and she included the following picture.

Falco in prison

Falco in prison

This was our first contact with Falco and the start of a wonderful rescue. The thought, or rather: realisation, that so many animals are killed ONLY 3 DAYS after they arrive at the pound, prompted my wife and I to consider carefully if there was indeed something that WE could do. Yes, we needed a guard dog that could provide security and company for those that are looking after our house in the Philippines after our beautiful and loving puppy Tosca died of heartworm some months earlier. So after some serious discussion (recall that at present we are still located in the Netherlands and have no way of regularly training a dog in the Philippines) we decided to give him a fighting chance, if only to save at least ONE of those poor souls.

Falco’s capture in Belair, Manila

Tracy Tuason, Falco’s rescuer and volunteer with CARA, wrote:
Last Sept 18 Belair Village guards (this is where I stay) observed Falco hanging around outside the village gate at Jupiter Street. He was attempting to enter Bel air premises and the guard on duty kept shooing him away. But after several attempts Falco was able to slip thru the gate and started running inside Bel air. He ran to Mercury Street and entered a house with an opened gate. The guard did not chase him because he was on duty and could not leave his post. But he called it in and other security personnel started looking for him. Nobody saw him enter the house so the search took quite a while.But the people in the house where he entered saw him and got scared and reported it. Security tried to catch him but he ran away from the house and acoording to the guard i spoke with the chase was long and hard. They finally asked help from the pound people and after several hours they were able to rope him around the neck and was dragged to the vehicle. This, I think, was the thing that got him so angry. A pound person told me that Falco was badly strangled and for sure was hurt. That’s why I think up to the present he really doesn’t like and trust men. He can’t forget what happened to him.

He was placed in the horrible dog cages of Belair and it wasn’t until a week after that I learned that there was a dog kept in the cages and that he was very very fierce and angry. I went to look at him and the moment I saw him I felt so much pity that I knew I was going to get involved in this dog’s life. By that time no one had come to claim him and Belair was set to turn him over to the Makati City Pound. Once there , if he was not claimed by three days he will be euthanised. I asked Belair Manager, Gloria Ambay, to put off sending him to the pound for another week so that I could help in finding his owner and by doing so his life would be spared. Gloria graciously agreed and my sister and I took photos of Falco and made quite a number of fliers. We posted them outside the streets of Belair, thinking that he came from the barangay adjacent to Belair called Poblacion.

After distributing the fliers all over even the nearest local market i waited everyday I waited for someone to call and claim Falco. I had hope that he would be found by his owner. After all he was a healthy looking dog and was obviously taken cared of very well. He was even wearing a green fatigue collar when caught. He wasn’t a stray. But nobody called within the week and my heart was sinking. There were a few more days left before Bel air would once again call the pound. During tis whole week of reprieve I would visit Falco at the cages 2 times a day to feed him. I told the maintenance people to stop feeding him because they would just give leftovers and he would get spoiled by that. My sister, also named Nancy (like Nancy Cu Unjieng of CARA, red.), contributed and bought him a 20 lbs bag of dog food and this is what i brought to him everyday.

I found it quite difficult to feed him because he would snarl and bark angrily at me. I was so scared to put food inside his cage because he would try to bite my hand. So I asked the help of a Belair guard named Nierva who was brave enough to put food in the cage and also clean it everyday with much difficulty because Falco was so angry. I was getting disheartened because now it was becoming clear that he can’t be adopted out and would eventually be euthanised by the pound. I called several people who are in high profile dog welfare and whom I thought could help him be rehabilitated so he could be saved from the pound and be adopted later but none of them really helped. Nancy C. said that these people were all show and are not really truly committed to animal welfare.

During this last week in Belair 2 pound people, Ed and Ver, would visit Falco in the cages and try to befriend him so that the transfer to the pound will not be bloody. They also brought him fresh food which they would get form the Mandarin hotel to give to the other dogs caught in the pound. If there are people who really care about dogs, these two from the pound are the ones. Even if dogs at the pound will eventually be euthanised, Ed and Ver treat them with great care and respect. It would be them who would point out Inggo to me (and another female dog) and asked me if I could save them because they were sweet and gentle dogs. It was also during this week that Nancy C. had the photo of Falco put out in the CARA website and sent to many in the Animal Welfare Coalition including Michel. But the day came that Belair told me that Falco’s time was up and must be sent to the dreaded pound.

Falco goes to prison

The day I was dreading arrived. On Oct 3 the pound people, Ed and Ver, came in the afternoon to get Falco. I was so nervous because I knew the transfer would be bloody. The dog will not go without a fight. The pound is not equipped with that pole with a rope noose at the end which is used in the States to catch dogs. They were going to use plain rope to tie around the neck and drag Falco out. This will be traumatic because of what happened to him when he was caught. I was really sick to my stomach anticipating the inevitable struggle. But to everyone’s surprise when they roped him and pulled him out he became docile and did not even whimper. Falco walked calmly to the waiting pound truck and carried up at the back of the truck without a struggle. It was obvious that being caged all those two weeks in Belair was what made him really angry and frustrated. I don’t think caging him for prolonged periods now and in the future will be a good idea. I had spoken to the pound vet, Dra. Pinky Manalastas, a few days before and asked her not to euthanise Falco and to keep him in the pound for a week while I plan the next move. She agreed but only gave me a week because even if he is not euthanized within 3 days he will also end up dying in the long run because disease spreads like wildfire in the pound. Meanwhile I asked my uncle if we could transfer Falco to his empty house in Belair after his time in the pound and he agreed as long as it was temporary.

Falco in his prison cell

Falco in his prison cell

I got in touch with a canine unit guarding hotels and malls and asked them if they would be interested in getting Falco as one of their bomb sniffing dogs. They came to the pound and took a look at him but
decided not to get him. Now, I am so thankful that they did not because Nancy (of CARA, red.) has had reports that this particular agency does not really treat their dogs well. Fortunately, it was also this time that Michel more or less made up his mind to adopt Falco. Up to this point we would call him Facundo, a name my sister gave him for comic relief and thanks to Michel the name was changed to Falco. During this time Ver and Ed would walk him twice a day and his disposition improved dramatically. I would also go visit him daily and I noticed that he was getting less angry and aggressive. Even when he was caged it did not bother him because the space was huge compared to that of Belair’s and he was all by himself and not mixed with other dogs.

It was this time at the pound on Falco’s third day that they brought in Inggo and i noticed him immediately because he would cry and stand up on his hind legs as if begging me to take him out of there. He was placed with the other dogs and it was quite heartbreaking to see all of them knowing that in a few days most of them will be dead if not claimed. They all looked pitiful and up to this day I don’t know if I want to go back there.

Release from prison

The seven days of Falco at the pound and on Monday Oct 13 the pound took him to my uncle’s empty house although he had a caretaker and family living there with a dog I also rescued last March. By this time Michel had given us instructions for neuter and shots and our emails were mostly procedures how to send Falco to Kalibo. I would visit Falco 2 times a day and take him for long walks. He really loved to walk and became quite a happy dog. He was becoming very attached to me and would cry everytime I would leave. On Wednesday October 15 Ver and Ed asked me to rescue Inggo and another small white female dog left at the pound 2 days before by her owner who went abroad permanently. They said these two were worth saving and I agreed. I went to the pound again, paid the adoption fees of P150 ea. and they were given rabies shots there. I also put them up at my uncle’s house but had to transfer the little female to my house because she was shivering badly out of fear. She didn’t stay long with me. Two days after, she was adopted by a friend who has 2 Shih Tzus and now I hear is very happy there. Falco was neutered at the CARA clinic Thursday Oct 16. Oct 18 Nancy, Barbara and I went to Cartimar to buy his kennel for the flight. He was supposed to fly to Kalibo on the 23rd but because of my hectic schedule I was not able to take Falco to the vet for his shots and so the trip had to be moved to the 25th. It was on the 23rd that Falco got all his shots plus a much needed bath. Falco was getting sweeter and sweeter by the day! I knew I was going to miss him when he goes. On Saturday Oct 25 I walked Falco early in the morning and at 8:30 we left for the airport. I gave him a pill to make him drowsy before leaving. We went straight to Cebu Pacific Cargo and I arranged all his quarantine papers and paid the fare. I forgot to take photos! Then they loaded him in the forklift and he was out of sight. I never felt so sad!

Tracy Tuason and Falco

Tracy Tuason and Falco

Falco’s adventues in Aklan
I went home after the airport and since Falco’s flight was at 11:45 I didn’t call Aling Leonora (Neressa’s mother, Red.) till 1pm. I caught her still at the aitport picking up Falco and I was so happy that he arrived there safe and sound. I called again later in the afternoon and Nanay (Neressa’s mother, Red.) said he was just lying down in the veranda resting. So everything went perfectly OR SO I THOUGHT!
Falcos reception committee at Kalibo Airport

Falco's reception committee at Kalibo Airport

Next day, Sunday, everything will turn around 360 degrees! It was 10 am Oct 26 that I first opened my cell phone and saw the frantic message of Nanay. I was in complete shock. Falco was missing! And he had not even been in Kalibo for 24 hours. By 12 noon I had decided to fly to Kalibo with encouragement from Nancy Cu Unjieng as she told me that the first 24 hours was crucial if we were ever to find Falco. Chances of finding him diminishes greatly after 24 hours. So this was what made up my mind. I thought that it would kill me just waiting for word here in Manila. So I reasoned that even if he is not found at least I tried all that I can do.I asked Barbara Greenwood, CARA secretary, to drive me to the airport and 45 mins before flight time I was still ih the long line of unticketed people. When it became just half an hour I desperately ran to a Cebu Pacific counter girl and begged her to help me, that I had a super emergency in Kalibo and they have to do something so i can make the flight. She sensed desperation and she hustled and got me ticketed right away! The ticket though was quite expensive because it was not booked ahead of time. I ran to the boarding gate and if I had been in the Olympic 100 meters sprint I would have won it.
I arrived in Kalibo at 4:30 pm and at 5:15 pm I was already searching around the neighbourhood in Andagao with Manang Ligaya (our helper, Red.) and about 6 little kids trailing us and also calling out the name of Falco.We walked continously until there was no more light and could not see our way at about 6:30 pm. I decided that we should resume the next day. Although we asked a lot of people if they saw Falco and all answered in the negative the 2 little boys in our search party spotted him at 2pm and this gave me hope that he was still in the area. We returned to Michel and Neressa’s house and I asked Eric (our tricycle driver, Red.) to come back the next day so i could hire him to drive me around in his tricycle so we could cover a lot more ground searching. Eric left and about 10 mins after that, he sent an SMS message to Nanay that he had Falco in his sight and that he entered a narrow passageway off the main road which led to a dead end of houses. We got so excited that I jumped from where I was sitting and rushed out to the street with Nanay following. We walked to the main road to flag down a tricycle but before we knew it Eric had come back to take us back where he had left Falco. On the way there I was so convinced that Falco would have moved on again and we would not see him. When we got to the place it was so dark that I had to strain my eyes to see the surroundings. There was a movement and all gasped but it was another dog. But I looked to my right and lo and behold there was Falco scratching the trunk of a coconut tree. I jumped out of the tricycle and called his name out loud. He turned and looked at me and in a second was running towards me. He jumoed at me and started licking my face and then lay down on the ground wanting me to scratch his stomach.As you can imagine I put my arms around him tight, attached the leash to his collar and loaded him inside the tricycle. I didn’t take my arms off Falco on the ride back and he himself did not fidget and stayed still as if he knew that now he was safe. We were all so happy in the house and it was as if we won ten million pesos in the lottery! Our adrenaline was really way up! I massaged Falco so he could relax and we fed him and he was really hungry and ate the food in just a few seconds. For sure that was his first meal of rhe day. I think he was so happy to see me that he had only eyes for me and he wouldn’t let me out of his sight. We bonded pretty heavily that night. He slept at the veranda whiile I had the use of Michel and Neressa’s wonderful room. During that night I felt that all that happened that day was like dream and during the night I would get up once in a while to peek out the window to make sure Falco was really there outside. It was heartbreaking to leave him the next day but now that Michel told me that he has taken to Ligaya, my hurt feelings have been assured!
I can’t thank Michel and Nene enough for taking Falco! May he have a long and happy life in Kalibo. He is worth all the trouble! he is a wonderful dog and you are quite lucky to have him! Inggo is doing well and steadily gaining weightand strength that now he barks at people he doesn’t know. Nancy wants him to become a goodwill hospital dog who visits sick kids to cheer them up. I think this will be an excellent job for him because of his sweet and gentle disposition.
Falco taking Manang Ligaya for a walk

Falco taking Manang Ligaya for a walk

Epilogue
So far Tracy’s side of the story. I’m sure you agree that this is indeed a formidable rescue, illustrating an exemplary dedication on her part. Compliments Tracy and well done!!!
At the moment, Falco is doing quite well. Unfortunately, I’m unable to train him until we can move to Kalibo on a more permanent basis, but he’s certainly quite happy now. He’s also good at his job: guarding our property, for which he gets rewarded with all the food that he likes. He is even learning to share the property with our cats Mimi, Mozart and Mitch.
Alls well that ends well!

All's well that ends well!

posted by Michel on Sep 18

Mind you, this was not one of our own rescues, but one conducted regularly by Ms. Jackie Baut, currently working in Palawan, assisted by Jocelyn of Pension Natividad. Just across the hotel from Natividad at Del Pilar Street in Malate there is a vacant lot where a number of stray animals would assemble. Jocelyn feeds these animals regularly from her own resources. Since Jackie runs an animal welfare organisation back in Palawan and visits Manila and Natividad regularly, she catches the cats, takes them home to get them sterilised and let them recover, and finally brings them back to where they came from. However, our own Mozart was just way too sweet to just let her go back so Jackie asked us if we were willing to adopt her. Of course we were and one morning Cebu Pacific carried a dirty but happy cat to Kalibo airport.

Cat rescue by Jackie and Jocelyn

Cat rescue by Jackie and Jocelyn

posted by Michel on Sep 18

Although this rescue failed in many ways, we did learn a lot from it and it made us re-think a number of things that we took for granted until then. One of the chaps working on our house arrived on his motorcycle one afternoon, carrying a simple bag in his hands. Inside was the most frightened puppy I have ever seen. Well, little wonder of course, being stuck in a bag like that! Of course we tried to accomodate Shakey as well as we could but before long he had already bitten me a few times. Still a puppy, that was of little consequence, but this made me very afraid of what the future would bring. What if, as an adult dog, he would bite one of the neighbour’s kids who would then hold us responsible? Consider that we normally live in the Netherlands and have very little control over what our helper does with our animals. The risk of mishaps was just too much so after a week we had to decide to return Shakey to his rightful owners, by car this time. They promised to look after him but his fate remains unclear to this day … We can only hope that he’s still out there somewhere and we are extremely sorry that the circumstances of his condition didn’t allow us to adopt him. Had we already lived there and been able to take enough time to restore his trust and confidence in humankind, things would have been VERY different for the little chap.

Shakey, too frightened to be true

Shakey, too frightened to be true

posted by Michel on Sep 18

As was to be expected, once the word gets out that someone is prepared to take on responsabilities, more animals start to arrive. Again, like in the case of Tosca the kitten, our helper was given a puppy. By the time we arrived on the scene she was still quite healthy and it turned out that her brother lives across the road. We took her to the vet, had her innoculated and sterilised. Not being on location for a long time to come, we had already accepted the fact that Tosca would never be an obedient dog as we would expect in the Netherlands. Instead, she roamed around our yard, played with her friend Mitch (kitten of about the same age) and chased butterflies, occasionally the other cats and generally led a very happy life. Then one day my mother-in-law, who’s in charge when we’re not around, called to say that they had found blood in her poo-poo and that they had taken her to the vet. There it appeared she had been very ill for a while already, presumably heartworm. She died a few days later, only about 9 months old. We realise that at present it is VERY hard to give an animal the care it needs at such great distance (Netherlands – Philippines), but that it was the best we could have done for her. We are proud to have known this intensely friendly and joyous little creature and are convinced she would have made us a fabulous companion had we been around. Thank the Lord that we were able to spare her the life of a street dog and give her a happy childhood and adolescence.

Last picture of Tosca, just 9 months old

Last picture of Tosca, just 9 months old

Tosca, happy little youngster

Tosca, happy little youngster

posted by Michel on Sep 18

This friendly chap had been hanging around our house for a few months. When we first saw him, he kept his distance and appeared friendly but shy. This time however, he was far more willing to approach us and I think the reason as that he must have felt he was in deep trouble. Presumably in a fight with a dog, his left rear leg had been badly damaged so that now it was a gaping infected wound. After my wife lured him onto the veranda and gaining his trust, we took him to the vet the next day. They cleaned up his wounds and gave him medicine to fight the infection but in retrospect, we should really have amputated his leg. A few days later he died, presumably of tetanus. The VetMed faculty of Aklan State University asked if they could use his body for study, which we agreed to. So this fellow, whom we refer to as “Nonoy”, shall remain in our memories as a brave but friendly little soldier that gave his life for the advance of veterinary science in his region so that others like him may live …

Nonoy, gave his life for science

Nonoy, gave his life for science

posted by Michel on Sep 18

These two came to us in different ways. Our helper was offered two cute kittens from our neighbours across the road. In my naivety I decided that we should not just take on every animal that was thrown over our walls and educate the neighbours to take their responsibility. This was a fatal decision that I still regret even today. The neighbours simply let nature take its course and abandoned them in their yard. That night the two poor little souls cried and cried for help so that I deduced what the neighbours had done and started a search. Mitch II was quickly recovered from another neighbour’s yard, but his sibling’s whereabouts remained a mystery. But did I hear another feeble voice in the swampish yard just up the road? I dived in and managed to locate the source: it was another, even younger kitten that we later named Tosca. After a thorough clean-up we fed them on the same diet as Mitch I. This time at least some luck was on our side and Mitch II turned into a healthy and playful kitten (see other pictures on this site). Sadly, we lost Tosca and had to bury her in our yard. Poor thing. Like with our first Mitch, we had arrived to late. What a way to learn a lesson at the expense of Mitch’s sibling. Now I would simply accept any animal because no matter what, it’s better of with us than with the neighbours who clumsily ignore the pleas for help from even their own pets …

Mitch, now a happy adolescent

Mitch, now a happy adolescent

Mitch survives!

Mitch II and Tosca: Mitch survives!

posted by Michel on Sep 18

On my way to an internet cafe, I found a kitten in the middle of a road (!!!). Not a high speed main road, but an important thoroughfare nonetheless. For those in the know, it’s the road next to the Chinese cemetery from the airport to Roxas Avenue in Kalibo. Anyway, I quickly stopped the car, blocking all traffic, grabbed the little fellow and moved on. We decided to name him Mitch in honour of the brave meerkat in the “Meerkat Manor” series on Animal Planet channel. It is very unfortunate that we knew little of newly born kittens. We tried to feed him on a mixture of milk, water and honey and occasionally some mashed fish. The first few days Mitch seemed to do OK, despite being emaciated and dehydrated when I found him. After a few days, his tiny body could go on no more and he died. However, we will always remember him and treasure the memory of these brief moments he spent with us for being our first rescue attempt in the Philippines. It is amazing how much impact even a brief encounter can have and how much one can bond with an animal by caring for it.

Mitch I, our first rescue that unfortunately failed

Mitch I, our first rescue that unfortunately failed